Category: Low Fuss

Stop the Stink

 

Mr Scraps and I ditched store-brought deodorant a while ago after I developed a rash using a popular brand roll on . Mr Scraps had issues with a few popular brands too, and after  reading some scientific papers linking some of the ingredients in popular brand name deodorants and antiperspirants with cancers and dementia we were both keen to find a natural alternative.

It took a bit of experimenting but we’ve found a few recipes that really work, cost next to nix to make and best of all don’t contain any nasty chemicals.

I make up two versions because Mr Scraps found my version (which uses baking soda) irritated his skin quite badly. Plus he likes his to have a “man stink” while I prefer a citrus scent.

Ms Scraps Homemade  Deodorant

 

1/4 cup baking soda

1/4 cup arrowroot flour or cornstarch

1/4 cup coconut oil

1 tablespoon shea butter (optional)

5 grams beeswax (optional)

10 drops essential oil ( I like tea tree or lemon but use whatever you like, or you can leave this out for a fragrance free version ).

A jar, tin or other container that will hold a smidgen over half a cup of liquid.

To make:  Melt the coconut oil, beeswax and shea butter in a heatproof bowl. You can do this in the microwave or place the bowl over a saucepan of water on the stovetop.

Add the other ingredients stirring until you get a smooth runny paste.

Pour into your jar and leave to set.

To used just scoop out a pea sized amount (you could use a spoon but I just use my fingers) and rub under your armpits.

Mr Scraps B.S. Free Man Stink

Mr Scraps Homemade Stink Stopper. He loves the recycled hair wax container we put it in!

For baking soda free version simply replace the baking soda for either diatomaceous earth or benotite clay. Mr Scraps likes sandalwood oil or frankensence oil for fragrance.

In really hot weather it might go a little liquidy so make sure you use a leak proof container if you’re travelling. The beeswax does stop this a bit.

If it’s really cold it’ll go hard. I just scrap some off the top. It melts from your bodysuit once you rub it on.

Web Errors, War Rations and BOB Cabbage Pasta

It’s been an interesting week so far and it’s only Wednesday!

Those of you who visit here regularly and follow along on face-lurk may have noticed that there are several post missing from the site.

It seems we may have been hacked (either that …or an update went wrong …or  I pushed the wrong button somewhere along the line…which is entirely possible) and Kitchen Scraps went down. I thought for a moment (well, a whole day) that I’d lost her forever. But a clever IT person showed me how to restore a website from old data, and we’re back online… minus a few recent posts. I’ll try and get those rewritten from my notes and re-posted.

It’s taught me a valuable lesson – BACK UP & PROTECT YOUR DATA!

It’s one we all know and should take heed of but in this techno-gizmo world, seem to ignore or just plain forget about. It was (only) a blog that I almost lost forever, but imagine if it was something really important or of huge sentimental value, like your entire collection of family photos, your next best selling novel or all your financials…

Sadly, one of the posts that went bye-bye birdy was the one I wrote about putting my family on War Rations. If you left a comment or saved the link, I’m sorry to say it’s gone now… but a big thank you. There were so many thoughtful and helpful suggestions, it really is a shame they’ve evaporated into the cyber-ether.

The gist of it was that a lot of my favourite (as in the ones I face-lurk and insta-stalk) food gurus and bloggers believe (like me) that we shouldn’t be wasting food. They also believe that it shouldn’t be as ridiculously difficult or expensive to feed our families healthy nutritious meals.

One of my favourite blogs is written by Carolyn Eakins who recreates authentic World War 2 meals. It’s called the 1940s Experiment (my all time favourite modern era) and uses the principals of English wartime rationing to help control her weight and keep herself healthy. She’s not the only one calling for a return to the culinary habits of our immediate ancestors either Sarah Wilson, Jamie Oliver and Hugh Fearnley- Whittingstall are just three others that come to mind.

Leonora Green  1941. Coupons Required.
Leonora Green 1941. Coupons Required. Image from the collection of the Imperial War Museum London.

The short of it is WW2 rationing saw people eating less sugar, less meat, less fat and more veg. They had to use everything because there was only so much available.This went for everything, not just food. In short, people were healthier,were far more frugal and wasted very, very little.

It sounds almost exactly what we’re trying to do here, right?!

While we’re not at war (although I’m guessing there’s a few world leaders who’d like us to be) and there’s no shortages of food here, I’ve really been embracing the principals of rationing this past few weeks. More veg, less meat and making sure we stick to a meal plan, shop only when really needed and (except for staples like rice, flour and dried beans,peas and lentils etc) using things up completely before running out to buy more.

As a result, I’ve come up with a few new “BOB” recipes (BOB stands for – BACK OF BOAT – those quick, simple, inexpensive  yet  totally delicious meals that can be eaten with one hand or out of a high sided bowl with just a fork or spoon while sitting on deck and lazily drifting on the ocean).

BOB CABBAGE PASTA

This is my take on the old braised cabbage that your mum or grandma might have made. Cabbage was big in England in WW2 because it could be grown at home. The Ministry of Food even issued instructions to housewives on how to cook cabbage in the most economical way. It was pretty much a staple here in Australia too because its cheap, nutritious and like other veg, wasn’t rationed.

Ministry of Food How to cook cabbage WW2 instructions
During WW2 England’s Ministry of Food issued leaflets informing people of the most economical way to cook cabbage.

Don’t worry, this isn’t a recipe for boiled cabbage. In fact there’s no boiling water required. Except for some chopping of ingredients, this literally takes minutes to make. It’s economical too. This makes enough to feed 6 of us as a main meal (or 4 with leftovers). It uses very little meat and only a little oil or butter. You can add additional veg or change out the bacon or chorizo for chicken, pork or you can leave it out altogether.

1 head of cabbage. shredded to the thickness of fettuccine or spaghetti noodles.

1 Onion finely sliced.

2 rashers of bacon finely diced

1 chorizo sausage finely diced

2 tablespoons of olive oil or butter (I like to use a tablespoon of each).

A sprinkle of chilli flakes or one finely diced chilli.

Any other veg you’d like to add finely shredded with a grater (zucchini is great, so is carrot or capsicum)

Salt and pepper to taste.

A large pan (I make this in the 20 Litre stainless steel pot I use to make stock, soup and stew. It has a tight fitting lid and if there’s leftovers, it fits straight onto the bottom shelf of our fridge).

Heat the oil/butter in the pan and add the bacon, chorizo, chilli and onion.

Saute a few moments until the onion is a little soft and starts to go translucent.

Add the cabbage and stir over a low heat until well combined and cabbage has softened but still has a little crunch.

Season to taste with salt and pepper.

To serve just put a generous serving in a bowl.

 

 

 

 

Fake-Away Chorizo & Tomato Pasta

What’s a  Fake-Away?

No it’s not pretend food or meals where you tell the family they’re eating one thing but you’re really serving them something else. (Remind me to tell you the four-legged chicken and decoy cake stories one day).

Fake-Away meals are the meals you make in less than ten minutes after a really draining day or when something really unexpected disrupts the menu plan instead of dropping in to the local takeaway. They’re our version of “convenience” food or “fast- food”. Instead of picking up take-out through the drive through (not that there’s one here anyway), one of us will run into the local supermarket and grab some stuff (if we don’t happen to already have the required ingredients already in the pantry).

Fake- Aways are fairly healthy, low cost, low waste and filling meals. They’re great for holidays when you have access to a kitchen but would rather spend your time exploring rather than cooking (I took the makings of this particular fake-away on our trip last weekend). They’re also great for those CCB (“can’t be bothered”) nights or summer evenings when you don’t want to spend an hour over a hot stove heating up the house.

To Qualify as a Fake-Away for us they have to:

1. use things that can be easily brought plastic free (once you know which brands to buy) from most supermarkets.

2. be prepared in less than 10 minutes

3. be something every family member will happily devour

4. not require any “weird” or “one-off” ingredients

Chorizo & Tomato Pasta Fake-Away

1 jar/bottle of passata (any brand will do, but we go with the ones that have no added sugar, organic if available and are just tomatoes with a little salt and citric acid. You could also use a couple of cans of tomato puree but I find the ones available here are made mainly from tomato paste/concentrate,not whole tomatoes so they tend to be a bit overpowering plus most cans are plastic lined these days and we try to avoid plastic if wherever we can).

1 box pasta (if I haven’t already got some dried homemade pasta in the pantry I buy the “Barilla” brand because it’s the only reasonably low priced brand I’ve found that comes in a box instead of plastic for anything other than lasagna sheets, although recently they added a little cellophane window to some of the the boxes).

2- 3 Chorizo Sausages (from the deli, not the plastic wrapped ones or you can use any other kind of sausage or meat you like, leftover roast chicken is good).

A pinch of salt. 

A Sprinkle of Herbs to taste.

Pop your pasta in a pot of boiling water and while it cooks chop your chorizo into bite sized pieces and brown lightly in a hot pan. Add the passata, salt and herbs to taste (we like oregano, basil or rosemary).

As soon as your pasta is aldente (cooked but still a tiny bit chewy), drain it and stir through the Chorizo & Passata sauce. Serve in bowls with a little grated cheese & a chunk of bread.

It takes about 8 minutes for the pasta to cook and you can have the chorizo and passata sauce done easily in that time, so this Fake-Away really does take less than 10 minutes.

Variations: I’ve already mentioned that you really could use just about any meat you like. You might like to add an onion or a few sliced chilli’s to the sauce. You can also throw in some grated vegetables, or leave out the meat completely and make it with mushrooms or eggplant. Serve with homemade garlic bread (mince a clove or two of garlic, stir it through some butter and spread on thick slices of bread. Pop them in the oven for a few minutes or even under the grill and they’re done).

 

Sunday Scraps – In the Scrap House this week & dishwasher tablets

This Week in the Scrap House

We’ve had a busy week. Mr Scraps spent the week sorting through the shed and packing up all our unwanted bits and pieces to sell at a friend’s garage sale. The Teens had the usual school week with football and netball training thrown in (the youngest Teen’s team won their  game by a massive margin this week). The Uni Student popped in a few times and is off interstate for a few days with the Eldest who graced us with his presence for dinner Friday night. We also made the trek over to Grandma & Grandad Scraps for an afternoon tea on Saturday which turned into dinner.

I’m now getting to the pointy end of my Archaeology Honours Project (the bit where you have to actually do something with all the data you’ve collected and historic documents you’ve unearthed, scanned and photographed). As a result there’s been a fair amount of thinking, hair-twisting and pacing up and down in front of a blank computer screen. In between, Miss T and I managed to do some experimenting with bread recipes, planted out our celery and leek butts that have been sprouting on the kitchen bench, tried our hands at sauerkraut with some red cabbage (much easier than I imagined) and spent Saturday morning knitting at the local library for World Wide Knit in Public Day. She made and installed her first ever “Yarn Bomb”. and as a result  the librarian has given us permission to decorate all the trees.I don’t know who was more excited, the Threenager or my friend who had neglected her own knitting project to help her craft her installation piece. She also proudly modeled a new prototype vintage fabric skirt from Vintage Bubs . She was allowed to keep it and we had to pries it off her to pop it  in the wash after an afternoon in the park.

There was also a lot of experimenting with homemade cleaning products. We already have a few “go to” cleaners we make ourselves, but a couple of them have ingredients that are either a little expensive or difficult to get without ridiculous amounts of plastic packaging or trips into the nearest large town. I shared a post about experimenting with dishwasher tablets over on the Facebook page this week and a lot of people asked 1) How they went and 2)  If I could please share the recipe.

Why I wanted to make our own dishwasher tablets

Dishwasher tablets are very convenient, but usually expensive (hard to pay less than 18-20 cents per wash) and although they come in a box they’re usually individually wrapped in little plastic packets inside it. The powder is better package wise with most brands only packed in a cardboard box, but still not all that cheap. Both contain chemically stuff or things I’m not happy to ingest, like borax.

Now while borax isn’t thought to be particularly dangerous, there is some evidence that it has the potential to cause skin irritation, stomach upset  and may be a hormone disrupter. There’s lots of recipes for homemade dishwasher powders and tablets out there on the web, but most of them contain the stuff, so I’ve been on a bit of a mission to find a way to make my own without borax. This week I think we’ve done it. After two full dishwasher loads (I only turn our dishwasher on when it’s really full, about every second or third day) and both have come out clean as a whistle without any residue left on the glassware.

Lemon Dishwasher Tablet Recipe

Ingredients

1 Cup Washing Soda

1 Cup Bicarbonate of Soda (Baking Soda)

1 Cup Salt

3/4 Cup Lemon Juice.

2 Ice Cube Trays (or similar)

Mix all your dry ingredients then pour in lemon juice (make sure you use a fairly large bowl because it fizzes quite a lot for a few moments). Mix it really well and divide mix between the ice cube trays packing down really firmly. Leave to dry at least a few hours before popping them out and leaving overnight to dry completely. Keep in an airtight container and use like any commercial dishwasher tablet.

Notes:

This recipe makes 24 tablets (or more if you use a smaller mold). I used two 12 hole plastic ice cube trays because that’s what I had. They came out quite easily, but silicone might be even easier. Just make sure that your tablets will fit in your dispenser. To check just fill your container with water and freeze, take one of the ice cubes, pop it in the detergent dispenser and make sure it closes properly.

Be fairly gentle when you pop them out of the trays. They do harden up a bit more as they dry. There were a few crumbly bits (which is why  they put the commercial tablets in plastic wrap). I just scrapped them up and will pop them in the dispenser like powder.

If you prefer powder, just omit the lemon juice and instead use 1 Cup of Citric Acid, mix together and keep in an airtight container. To use place 1 tablespoon per load in the dispenser.

Tip:

For sparkly glassware, pop white vinegar in the rinse aide dispenser.

If you find you have some residue on your dishes after the dishwasher cycle finishes, try making sure the water going through your machine is nice and hot. Pop a pot or bucket in your sink, turn on your hot tap and let the water run a moment until it’s flowing hot before switching your machine on (this can also help with store-brought dishwasher tablets or powder). I empty the water in the pot into my washing machine or use it to water plants or wash the floors so it doesn’t go to waste (it’s usually less than a litre but in winter when the pipes are really cold its more).