Category: Opinion Pieces

2018 Ration Challenge Survival

Warning: This is a long post about a week of limited food choices. I did this as a sponsored challenge to help raise funds to support the humanitarian works of Act for Peace who, among other things, provide food rations for refugees from places torn apart by things like war and famine. In no way do I recommend this as a day-to-day diet for anyone who has access to fresh healthy food.

Prep Day

Okay. The challenge starts tomorrow. I’ve raised enough through sponsorship to “earn” some salt, sugar, milk and garlic powder. I joined a team of other ration challengers and apparently we can share ingredients so I also have access to some other spices and an extra 100 mls of milk or 25 grams of sugar.

My rations for the week. There’s a few extra lentils and chickpeas in the jars as when I took this picture I was experimenting with a few recipes before the challenge began to see if I could adapt them for during the challenge week.

I’m going for the milk as we don’t usually even have white sugar in the Scrap House pantry, let alone cook with it.

I used some of my flour and oil rations to make some flatbread. That was easy enough but I had to then make some extras because Miss T will eat them all before I get any.

I actually remembered to soak some of my chickpea ration in water last night for a very basic hummus (just blended chickpeas with a little of their cooking water, some salt and garlic powder).

I’ll be at work through the week where there’s likely to be temptations (like the coffee machine and meeting cake, not to mention the smell of all my workmates reheating last night’s curry for lunch in the office kitchen) so I make some rice crackers with Rice flour, water and a little oil. To make the rice flour I ground up two cups of rice in the blender and finished it off with my mortar and pestle. I added some salt and garlic powder to half the batch so I could have them as desk snacks for work. They turned out quite well.

My Rice Crackers and Hummus turned out quite tastey

Day 1

It’s a Sunday so I got up and made congee for breakfast (basically over-cooked rice). I added 50mls of my milk ration and a sprinkling of sugar. It was a bit like porridge and quite delicious so I made some more for the next few days (and yes the challenge orgamisers provided everyone with information on safe food handling for storing and reheating things like cooked rice).

Lunch was flatbread with some hummus and plain rice and for dinner I made Lentil Soup using half my lentil ration, some more rice, some garlic powder and 1/4 of a red capsicum which I traded with a team member for half my sugar ration. I made enough for four meals, so was set for a few work lunches during the week. The hardest thing was watching the rest of the Scraps eat roast dinner while I slurped on my soup.

Rice and Red Lentil Soup.

Day 2

I’m not going hungry. Yesterday was fine but today I’m suffering from serious Coffee withdrawal. Congee for breakfast, soup for lunch, hummus and rice crackers for snacks and fried rice made with a sardine, a few kidney beans and garlic powder and a pinch of chilli powder (shared spice from a team mate).

Day 3

The coffee withdrawal headache set in big-time so when one of my team mates offered to give away one of her two teabags or two spoons of coffee I almost took the coffee, but (sensibly I think) I took a teabag. I didn’t actually have any teabags (we don’t buy them as many of the bags actually contain plastic) so I substituted a teaspoon of leaf tea.

Lunch or Dinner was quite often just rice and flatbread

Day 4

The headache still isn’t going away. I’m not starving but I’m very over rice. I had the last of my soup for lunch. I finally raised enough through offline donations to earn 170grams of vegetables. I chose a large brown onion, 1/4 of which I shared with the team mate who had so generously given me some capsicum and a handful of spinach leaves. I made the mistake of going to the gym as usual after work yesterday and am paying for it today feeling very sore, drained and blah. Someone reheated a casserole for lunch at work. I’m really missing food that isn’t beige.

Day 5

More rice. Sardine on flatbread for lunch. My rice crackers are all gone, so is almost all the hummus. Headache is gone but we’re going to the movies tonight. I made sure to put extra rice into my lentil soup for dinner before we left so I wouldn’t be tempted by popcorn. We usually take our water bottles and other snacks so I had roasted a handful of my remaining chickpeas but there weren’t many. I managed not to cave in to the delicious buttery, salty popcorn that Mr Scraps tried to tell me was disgusting and rubbery (as he shoved handfuls of it into his mouth).

Day 6

This morning I made piklets (little pancakes) with the last of my flour ration and the water I cooked my chickpeas in. The Younger Teen and I had them for breakfast with the last scraps of my hummus. They were delicious.

Chickpea Juice Piklets. These were delicious! The Chickpea Juice worked like a vegan egg and made them a bit fluffy. I’ll definitely be making these again.

I reused my tea leaves for about the hundredth time. They had no flavour anymore but the act of making tea is somehow satisfying. I had the last of my sardines and some lentils with onion and rice for the rest of the day. I made more rice flour for flatbread. Refugee food takes A LOT of preparation (soaking, grinding, portioning so you don’t run out). There’s definitely no room for waste.

Day 7

Down to pretty much rice and a few kidneys beans, lentils, oil and precisely 9 chickpeas. I made it through the day. I made it through the week. My team members (all bar someone who had to stop a few days early for medical reasons) made it. We didn’t starve, but it wasn’t easy. Some people experienced stomach problems (bloating, constipation etc), some lost significant amounts of weight (not in a healthy way, I don’t recommend this as a weight loss diet). We all experienced tiredness and lethargy and most of us had headaches at one stage or another because of this (and in my case also due to caffeine withdrawals). I struggled days 3-5 at work because of it, and I was just sitting at the desk writing reports this past week, there’s no way I could have done it if I had to do any fieldwork.

Just Rice and and the last few Chickpeas. I actually like rice, but after this week it may be a while before I eat it again.

Collectively my team raised over $13,000 AU, which is enough to provide rations for 55 refugees for a year.

It’s been a seriously humbling experience and has opened my eyes to just how little we need food wise to actually survive and just how much excess we buy. While the Scrap House is fairly low waste, there was definitely no room for waste this week.

With a few modifications, some of the recipes I improvised may even make it into our regular meal plan.

While the challenge is now over, our team page my personal sponsorship page will remain open for donations until September. You can donate here: https://my.rationchallenge.org.au/meaghana

Crushing on Food Show Hosts and Why I don’t believe in “Superfoods”

Warning – Kinda ranty post with lots of research-y link things where I pick on quinoa and kale (a lot). If you’re offended by this click away now…

A typical weekly Scrap House “Superfoods” haul from the greengrocers.

Okay, I’m going to admit it… I spend far more time than I tell my family binge watching Food Network. Not only that, I then go off and stalk the show hosts I like on the interwebs.  

In doing so over this past few months I have developed a huge crush on Anthony Bourdain. Not the kind of teenage-girly-mid-life-crisis-leave-your-husband kind of crush, but one of those crushes when someone out there just “gets” ( obnoxiously swearingly agrees with) the way you think about stuff and then takes it a bit further and more think-y-er. (His recent essay on sexist kitchen culture has made him just that bit more interesting and attractive).

In short, I have an intellectual food-crush on this guy (she says adding him to the ever-growing list of food crushes … Sarah Wilson, Rachel Khoo, Maggie Beer, Rick Stein and that River Cottage Guy are just a few others. It’s getting pretty long). He’s not more special than any of the other chefs, cooks or obnoxious opinionated food lovers I follow on the interwebs. I  actually don’t know that much about his foody history, but I do like his no-BS commentary on the places he visits.  In particular like the attitude he shows towards food in his TV shows.

Yes, he visits “classy” “trendy” places and tries out all the fancy overpriced weird crud they offer, but the best bits are where he eats “real food” (and compares it to politics and stuff). The kind of food street vendors and somebodies Nona have been making for centuries (sometimes longer). And guess what… none of the stuff he rates as awesome is over-processed food chain or trendy “superfood” cafe fare. 

I actually cringe a little every time some hipster -wanna-be food guru uses the term “super-food”.

I feel more than a little miffed that all the so-called “experts” have treated us “ordinary” people like we’re just a little dim. I also feel a tad guilty that over the years, I too have been known to succumb to the hype spouted by popular and scientific media (yes scientists are hype-y too… they want you to believe that their research is better and more right-er than the other guys).

Take for example kale.

Yes its good for you, but, and I hate to be the one to tell you, kale is not new. I remember it in my own Nan’s garden in the 1970s (yes I’m that old) and there’s a bunch of WW2 era recipes out there that list it as a major ingredient (check out this recipe for Kale and Potato Soup). It grows just as easily as spinach or silverbeet, has the same kind of nutrients (there’s a table with all the numbers here for those who like that sort of thing). So quite frankly you can cram your $7 kale smoothie up your proverbial jacksy even if it is delicious. And I’m not the only one who thinks this. Theres a whole bunch of bloggers out there that tell you how to make your own and avoid the ridiculous Cafe prices (okay I lied theres just that one ). Even so, last time I went to the local greengrocer a bunch of kale was priced somewhere around $5. That’s still an expensive smoothie.

Same goes for those trendy quinoa salads (pronounced in our house key-noh-ahh) and chia (Chee-ahh) seed pudding slops. Okay, so I’ve tried them both. I’ll admit I did kind of like the pudding, it wasn’t abhorrent and I’m actually trying to use up the last of the chia seeds I brought months ago today by adding them to a beef casserole- kinda weird but its working.

I will also admit that I do love almond milk (used to make the pudding slop) which is both easily accessible here and not expensive. Almonds are grown on a farm near our house so I make the almond milk, mainly because I have an intolerance for the regular cow stuff, I’m not allergic it just makes me gag most days.

Yes, quinoa, chia seeds or your fancy dried frankle-frugen-berries are okay. Yes, they’re nutritional dynamite, but so is just about any fruit or vegetable if you don’t process the crap out of it. If you have food allergies and such they’re fab, but things like chia seed or quinoa are hard (almost impossible) to get un- plastic-packaged here in rural NSW, and often are transported in from overseas. Even if they are grown here in Australia are quite frankly overpriced for a lot of us feeding families on a budget. Quinoa costs approximately $14 per kilo here. Its currently around $2 per 100 grams at Woolworths, as opposed to  brown rice which is around 27 cents per 100 grams. Yes, quinoa beats brown rice for protein and a few other things but really they’re not all that different nutritionally, there’s a comparison diagram here.

Even “ordinary” foods have skyrocketed in price since being given the “super” label. Berries are the best example I can think of… blueberries here are $5 for a 200 gram punnet on a good day. That’s Australian dollars which equates to about 2 pound 50 or somewhere around $3.50 US depending on exchange rates and that’s just your un-organic supermarket variety, organic is (as always) a lot more. Frozen are often a lot cheaper (not to mention convenient) but again the plastic bag and transport.

Yeah okay so I made the frankle-frugen-berries up earlier, but you get what I mean….

In short, all these foodstuffs, and a whole lot of others are extremely un-family- budget or zero-waste friendly. Unless you have access to fantastic bulk stores locally, its hard to find most “superfoods” packaged in anything but plastic bags or other environmentally unfriendly containers. Yes they’ve got great nutritional stats, but so does almost every single unprocessed food (think whole grains, fruit, veg, dairy, meat). 

Add to that, the majority of recipes call for extra speciality ingredients that are equally ridiculous in price for families on a budget and get used once, thrown in the cupboard only to be forgotten and then thrown out next time you spring clean.

I have a suggestion for all of us that have succumb to the “superfood” hype at one time or another… it might not be a popular idea, but how about we forget it. Forget “superfood” altogether and eat “real” food instead. You know the stuff you can get at your local butcher, greengrocer, bakery or supermarket. If you have a green thumb or are lucky enough to live with someone who does, the stuff you grow yourself (hint-hint Mr Scraps, Grandad Scraps) and the stuff you can make in your own kitchen.

It’s better for you. “They” proved it in the 1940s (particularly in England) when people ate far less meat, less fat and less sugar than we do today due to rationing. It probably wasn’t the worlds most exciting diet most days (you had to take what you could get – there was a war happening) but on the whole people were fitter and healthier than they had been before or have been since. Give it a look-see on Dr. Google, most information is from England but here’s an SBS show about it . It was by no means perfect (nothing ever truly is, is it?) and food may have required a lot more preparation than today without our modern conveniences like refrigerators, microwaves and food processors, but it kept people, on the whole, fed and produced far far less waste than we do today.

For me personally biggest bonus to no longer buying into the “superfood” hype is that it saves sooo much time, mainly because its been done before. In the Scrap House we eat things like carrots, pumpkin, beans, mince beef and sometimes even…shock horror… white potatoes!

Why?

Because they’ve been done before. I don’t have to spend 14 hours trawling the internet trying to find out how the heck to cook that supa-dippity-do-dah ingredient after a day at work with a hungry 4-year-old at my feet. If you don’t slather most whole real food stuffs in fat or sugar they have nutritional values on the same levels as your expensive “superfood” varieties.  The biggest bonus is however, that NO ONE in the Scrap House turns their nose up at a humble baked spud or meatloaf full of hidden grated veg, they will however leave the kale chips to go limp on the bench  and that quinoa salad with laboriously extracted pomegranate seed embellishments to fester in the back of the fridge….

….. and it would of too, but I ate that stuff for lunch for a week just so it didn’t get thrown to the Immortal Chicken.

 

 

 

Why We Refuse to Resolution 

 

Some of you are probably glad 2017 is over, others sad to see it go. We’re a bit of a mix here. Fortunately more happy than sad. Whatever your feelings on 2017,all here at the Scrap House wish you a bright shiny Happy New Year… yes even Scrap Cat (possibly with some sarcasm – he’s a bit like that)

Happy New Year Humans… now either feed me or go away…

My personal & public Twit, Face-lurk and Insta-stalk notifications went nuts this morning with well-wishes for 2018 and declarations of goals for the year.

Save Money. Loose Weight. Get Fit. Travel. Get Rich. Be more Eco. Buy a House. Build a House. Become a Minimalist. Be More Spiritual. Start a Business.  Give up Booze or cigarettes or sugar or whatever else.

It’s great that everyone has “resolved” to do these things and I truly wish them well. Some of these are actually really awesome goals to have. But we all know that by the end of January most (practically all) of these resolutions will have fallen by the wayside.

Instead of resolutions in the Scraps House we set INTENTIONS throughout the year as the need arises/inspiration strikes.

The New Year is as good an opportunity as any to reflect upon our values and priorities.  We set (or at least try to) intentions to align our lives with these values. This isn’t goal setting—it’s not something we attach  expectations or evaluation to; rather, it’s a deliberate vision, a purpose, or attitude we’d be proud to commit to, one that matches our deepest sense of who we are.

They’re different to Resolutions because resolutions are goals and they are finite. They usually have a start and cut off date. EG. By December 31 I will have done/achieved X. That’s a lot of pressure. Intentions on the other hand (for us anyways) are about forming habits, going with the flow and building a lifestyle, yes they’re goals, but there’s no rigid time frames for any of it. Intentions allow you a little more wiggle room. You can re-evaluate as you go and a lot of times this can allow you to surpass whatever your original goal was.

Last year my personal intention was to finish my degree and find a job that was actually related to it. I talked about it a lot not to shout it out to the world, but more to motivate myself. Because I looked at it as an intention and not something set in stone I could tell people how sucky my essay sounded or how hard I was finding it to fit in study around work/kids/life. Yes I felt like chucking in the towel more than a few times, but because I hadn’t made it a resolution (other than assignment deadlines which were bad enough) to finish my degree by a certain date or at a certain level (other than the best I could do), set-backs like a lower than wished for mark on an essay didn’t make me give up or feel like a total failure (not always anyway).

Mr Scraps and I intended to reduce our household waste by whatever we could. This was a continuation of something we started a long time ago, not a new years thing. Its still going (in fact its on this years list as well) but we have no strict number on it. We produce maybe enough to fill a plastic bread bag (if I can find one) full of non-recyclable waste every fortnight,sometimes a little more, sometimes less. We’re still working on reducing the amount of recycling. If we’d resolved to get it down to a certain amount by a certain time (I see so many posts about people wanting to get down to that mason jar amount this year) we definitely would have given up long ago. Instead we’re happily plodding along, doing our best, making mistakes and learning from them.

Our intentions as a family are to simply continue being, to do what we can to reduce our waste and a bunch of other stuff. And we didn’t wait until new years to start any of them and I didn’t necessarily shout them out in public either.

Most things are little, some are larger but the list changes as we go.

Yep,I’d like to buy a boat and sail the world, build a tiny house and become a mountain dwelling self-sufficient hermit too…

But to be realistic….

This year we’re moving house so we intend to use it as an opportunity to reduce our stuff by leaving things in boxes until we actually NEED them. If we don’t have to get them out after 6 months or so we’ll sell or donate them.

Our household and  income is changing. Not just because we’re moving house. The Big kids are leaving home for their jobs, Mr Scraps will no longer be covered by insurance for his disability, the Younger Teen is turning 16, is changing schools and now has a part time job. Our intention is to try and build an emergency fund without sacrificing too much in lifestyle.

We’ve all over-indulged over the Christmas break, too much wine, too much sugar and just too much food in general (seriously will the ham never be finished? I feel like we’re drowning in the stuff). As of this week we’re taking a leaf out of one of my favourite blogger’s books (well posts) and intend to get back to basics with our food.

After my experiments growing food from scraps this past year my intention is to try and grow a few more edible things (probably in pots to start- although the house we’re moving to has a lemon tree already- yay. Expect lots of lemony recipes this year). Despite growing up on a farm I’ve never really done any growing of my own.The garden has always been Mr Scraps department, so I’m starting basically from scratch. I did receive this book for Christmas though, which I’m hoping will prove to be a bit of a useless Aussie gardener’s bible…

My celery I grew from a butt…

All of these intentions align quite nicely with our desire to live more simply and produce less waste.For me personally, intentions are about living low and slow, taking into account your environment, emotions and relationships.

What intentions do you have for 2018?

 

 

 

How Scrap family reduces food waste and saves some $$$

9 ways the Scraps family has reduced food waste and saved some money

Australian’s throw away thousands of $$$ worth of food a each year. That’s THOUSANDS! I don’t know about your family, but ours definitely doesn’t have thousands of disposable dollars laying around to waste on food that we don’t get to eat.

We’re by no means perfect or even experts but we do manage quite well on what I consider a very lower middle-class income. I’ve had lots of questions about it lately via face-lurk,  especially when I post about saving on groceries or put up recipes that feed the fam for next to nix. So today I’m going to share the principles we follow to reduce (mainly food) waste and save a few $$$ especially when the budget’s a bit tighter than usual.

1. Know what’s in the pantry

By knowing what’s in the fridge, freezer and  cupboards—fresh fruit N veg , canned stuff, dry herbs and staples like flour or rice—the less likely we are to return from the shops or to get home and realise we’ve already got one (or more) of something. On weeks when the budget’s really tight shopping the pantry first can be a real lifesaver. We often find enough for at least half a weeks meals are already there. The teens are really good at coming up with creative ideas for whats in the cupboard….they’re not always great ideas, but they are creative….

2. The List Abides

Writing a shopping list based on what’s at home and what we plan to cook during the week means we avoid buying more than whats needed and don’t purchase items we can go without. (Although I  do try to include at least one small “indulgence” each week like a little chocolate or the extra ingredients for a special desert or Lunchbox snack). I actually loathe shopping (of almost every kind) so having a list makes this a much faster and less painful task and thankfully, our greengrocer delivers!

3.  Check the expiry date

We check expiry dates when we’re shopping and try to buy things like milk, cheese, dry and tinned goods, with the longest shelf-life remaining possible. We position older items at the front of the fridge or cupboard, so they get eaten first (actually Mr Scraps  is much more vigilant about this than I am). If fruit and veg start to go a bit soft, we also look at ways to incorporate them into soups, sauces and desserts. If we’re short on time, we freeze them for later (which reminds me …I have a bunch of squishy fruit in the freezer that we can use for smoothies this week).

4. Portion control

No, I don’t mean we put the family on a diet. But we’ve found out the hard way that if there’s only three of us at home on Thursday but my meal plan looks more like something for when there’s five or six  of us, we end up tossing A LOT of uneaten food to the Immortal Chicken. We try to buy and cook only what we need. And if I’m  making extra,that it’s something that can be easily frozen for later. Every now and then I do this on purpose so there’s some individual servings of whatever in the freezer for lunches or those nights when something unexpected crops up and we can’t cook (or I just plain don’t want to).

5. Storing food

Airtight containers,  fridges and freezers all play a part in prolonging the shelf life of certain foods. So, if we’ve got meat in the fridge that we’re not going to eat this week,we  put it in the freezer. Same for fruit and veg. For example green beans are on special at the greengrocer this week so I’ve ordered a box full to be delivered.  After work today I plan to blanch and freeze most of them for later ( unless of course Mr Scraps channels his inner kitchen fairy and has it done already by time I get home).

6. Leftover nights

If we make more food than we can consume, rather than throw it out, we pack it for lunch or save it for dinner the following night. The bonus is I don’t have to cook again the next day. I try to have a Leftover night written into our Meal Plan once a week.

7. Keep a Container

In the car, bottom of the pram or your bag. If Mr Scraps and I or one of the Scrap kids can’t finish  our  restaurant meal, we ask to take it home. If we can stretch one meal into two – we not only  reduce waste and the second meal is essentially free so we save a few $$$$.

8.  Compost or find a chicken…

We don’t actually compost because we have the Immortal Chicken. Chickens are great for recycling things like fruit and veg peels (except onions and citrus) and all manner of scraps. If you don’t have a chicken of your own (or a neighbour who does) compost bins  and worm farms will break down food scraps and at the same time create natural fertiliser for plants. If you’re lucky (like people in our area) your local council has commercial compost facilities, but also check out your local schools or community gardens if you can’t (or don’t want to) compost at home.

9. Grow your own

Okay, so I’m not so great at this (I’m told I have a “black thumb”) but saving money is one of the biggest reasons people grow food at home. Having a stash of herbs and vegetables means  always having access to fresh ingredients and just the right amount. I have had some success regrowing veg like celery and carrot tops from the scraggy end bits we usually cut off and throw to the Immortal Chicken, but it takes a while and I’m too impatient.

S

IT’S ZERO WASTE WEEK! Day 4, Let’s Do Lunch!

Argh! Lunches! 

I actually hate packing lunches. I HAVE to do them the night before or it’s just utter chaos in the Scrap House of a morning. Silly really, I’ve been packing lunch for myself and others ever since I first left Grandma and Grandad Scraps house at  18. You’d think it’d be a doddle by now.

Thing is… work or school lunches are probably one of the easiest places to lower waste and save some monies.

For example, a couple of weeks ago I went to work one day  and didn’t pack my lunch because I have decided that just for one day a month I will treat myself and buy lunch from one of the cafe’s near the office. I budgeted for it out of my “mad money” (I might blog about how we budget one day) so it wasn’t a shock at all, but lunch cost me about $12. It wasn’t a fancy lunch either. A chicken schnitzel sandwich and a drink. It was nice. I was full afterwards and didn’t feel the need to snack at all between lunch and dinner. The archaeologist I work with also brought her lunch (a toasted wrap, some fries and a drink) for around the same price. We decided to take our lunches back to the office and eat in the conference room, so the woman at the cafe wrapped our schnitzel sandwich and toasted wrap in paper and put the fries in a bag (we both carry reusable coffee cups so no disposables there).

Not so bad I thought … but…. together our lunches cost about $25. I worked it out that if I worked 5 days a week (at the moment I’m only doing two but that will change next month when Uni finishes) and brought my lunch from a cafe every day at $12, thats $60 a week. Multiply that by 50 weeks and that’s a whopping $3,000 a year! Even more if Mr Scraps was doing the same… and more still if the Teens brought lunch from the Caf at their school every day!

I actually know families who do this. No wonder they’re broke despite earning decent wages.

Not only did it cost money but buying our lunch and bringing it back to the office also  left us with paper wrapping and paper bags. I know, paper is recyclable and compostable but….

When I bring my lunch from home in my own reusable container and make a coffee at work in my own cup it costs less than $5 (sometimes as little as $1 depending on what I pack). It also produces no packaging waste. That’s Zero Waste. 

Plus (if I’m doing it properly) it’s usually A LOT HEALTHIER than a schnitzel sandwich (I’m not giving them up completely though… I still love a good schnitty).But I quickly get bored of sandwiches and so do the Teens and Mr Scraps.

My work is actually great for zero waste lunches (I’ve blogged about our zero waste office before …you can read it here) and taking leftovers from last nights dinner is great but sometimes it’s nice to have something “special” just to break up the day. It makes the school or work day so much nicer if you know you have a great lunch to look forward to and you don’t have to worry about how much it’s going to cost you. So these are my must-haves for a great zero waste pack-up (I do ours the night before because … well you know…. mornings…) and at the bottom are some links to my current favourite pack-ups.

  • Drink/water bottles –  These are a must! I have a glass one because it sits on my desk but the Scrap kids have BPA free plastic ones because they get thrown about in school bags and dragged around the school oval at lunch time or during sports. I have a couple of spares tucked away in the back of the cupboard for those days someone forgets to bring theirs home.
  • Lunch Boxes –  I pack them up the night before. We have a collection. Plastic ones, wooden ones and metal ones. I like the Bento style ones with the little compartments. They get used for all sorts of things around here not just lunch, but we have lots because I like to cook extra stuff for the fridge or freezer so we can just grab-n-go. You don’t need a fancy box to put your lunch in though, just use whatever you have, an old Tupperware container  or reuse a takeaway box. The only rule about containers I have for the Scrap House is NEVER reheat anything in plastic (put it on a plate before you pop it in the microwave).
  • Jars – I’m really into food in a jar at the moment. So many things you can put in them Noodles, Oats, Salads, Soups and they look so pretty on Insta-stalk, That Pin Stuff  site and Face-lurk. It’s a good idea if you’re going to eat straight from the jar to have one with a wide mouth. They don’t have to be fancy mason jars either. We reuse old salsa and sauerkraut  jars. But anything you can put in a jar, you can put in an old Tupperware container…except maybe the soup (unless you’ve got a good lid).
  • A Thermos – we have a couple of those wide-mouthed ones and a tall skinny one for hot coffee or tea. A thermos for me is a must for fieldwork days and trips to the park with the Threenager. They’re awesome on cold winter days, but most people forget they’ll keep thing cool too! Just about anything you can put in a jar or lunchbox (that’s not a sandwich… although I haven’t tried it, maybe there’s a way) you can put in a thermos. Just remember if you’re going to eat straight from the thermos that you’ll probably need long-handled cutlery.
  • Beeswax or Vegan Wraps and Cloth Napkins – you can buy expensive wraps or make them yourself. I usually find that a napkin does the job, but beeswax or vegan wraps will act a bit more like cling-film. You don’t really need them if you have reusable containers. Its just handy to have something to wrap that sandwich or muffin in. I found the wrapper your butter comes in (wiped clean of course) is also a good alternative for small things.
  • Cutlery- You can get some lovely little “to-go” packs. The bamboo ones are cute, but the Scrap kids and I just grab flatware from the drawer. I brought some extra spoons and forks from the local op-shop a while ago (because someone will always leave one at school in their locker or in the dish drainer at work – although my work now has their own for us to use so I don’t need to take my own to the office anymore).

So  besides last nights leftovers, what do you pack in these things other than sandwiches?

There’s lots of “Lunch in a Jar” articles on the interwebs,and they’re not all for salad or noodles.Try here or here for ideas. And remember that anything you can put in a jar you can put in another container. But the jars look so damned pretty.

For times when I have access to a microwave, I like to cook up lasagne in small glasslock style containers. Just pop on the lid on when they’ve cooled and throw them straight in the freezer and pull them out on your way out the door. They make great “TV dinners” too for those nights when my meal plan doesn’t work, something unexpected comes up or I just can’t be bothered. Lasagne sheets are one of the few really cheap pasta options we can get here in a cardboard box, sometimes we make our own but we don’t always have the time (or the energy).

I also make pies for the freezer. I can get away with feeding the rest of the Scrap household almost anything if I wrap it in pastry. From scratch  I fry off some mince and onion, add some finely chopped veg and a little gravy then pop into pastry in the pie-maker that Mr Scraps found at a garage sale a few years ago (it makes four pies at a time before that I baked them in large muffin tins in the oven). More often though I make them from leftovers like vegetable curry, beef stew or homemade pasta sauce.

For winter,  soup is great for the thermos and it’s mega cheap if you make it at home! It does need to be heated up in the morning before popping it in the thermos though (unless you’ve got a super-duper on. I used too but the lid broke and I haven’t managed to find a replacement). There’s lots of soup recipes out there on the interwebs. I like to use up leftovers and veg scraps to make soup like my Carrot Top Soup. You can find a recipe here. Or I just throw some Scrap Stock in a pot, add veg and some shredded chicken, season well and you have chicken and veg soup.

For snacks (that aren’t fruit) we like – a little pot of dip or salsa with flatbread or veg like carrot or celery cut into sticks, Scrap to Snack MuffinsNot little Bear Biscuits, Banana Bread or  No Bake Museli Bars,

In an ideal world we’d have time to make everything from scratch and completely zero waste. it’s not an ideal world though so if you don’t have the time to cook from scratch (or your family are fussy eaters or  just plain out won’t eat homemade lunches) you can still do lower waste, cheap lunches. Just buy things in the biggest packets you can find to minimise packaging and keep the cost down. I sometimes do this with nuts or corn chips. Just dish them out into reusable containers  as  individual serves and recycle the packaging.

The challenge for today:  is to do a recipe book or internet trawl and find yourself (and anyone else you pack lunches for) some appetising pack-ups. Even if you are a stay at home mum without school kids and you’re packing snacks for a trip to the park with your baby or toddler, it doesn’t have to be boring.

 

I dropped the ball….

Actually, more like sat on it and it went “POP!!”.

My new job, a bit of extra training, full time study, sample knitting, blogging, cooking, cleaning, family…. and for the last month I haven’t seriously kept track of our household budget, cleaned the house properly.

I will say, Mr Scraps does his bit, he’s great at keeping the washing to a manageable level, wrangling the Threenager and driving myself and the Teens to and fro, but there’s some things his bit doesn’t cover. Mostly because of his physical limitations but also partly because (should I say it? because he’s a mere male?) it just doesn’t register for him.

Grotty shower floors, dishwasher smells because the filter hasn’t been emptied, scummy stuff on the inside of the washing machine, groceries, cooking, the electric and gas bills are my domain.

I’m afraid I have to admit that this last few weeks I haven’t managed to keep any of it totally under control.

I’ve done the basics.

The kids all have clean clothes…oops that was Mr Scraps (I just folded and put away or rather threw on the Teens bed and demanded they put it away… needless to say most of their clothes are probably safely stored in what I call their “floor-drobes”).

Everyone is fed.. yes I did this but we’ve been eating frozen leftovers and fake-aways for the past week.

The recycling is piling up in the laundry (Not the stuff that goes in the curbside recycle bin but all the other bits and pieces like soft plastics, old store cards and unwanted books or clothes that I usually drop off on my way to work, post in or organise for someone else to drop off when they’re travelling via a drop-off point).

We all have clean bed sheets, the kitchen benches and the loo are clean … but everything else is… well… meh.

And last week I brought wine IN A BOX! the kind with the baggy thing inside and the plastic poury nozzle… in my defence it was nice wine that Mr Scraps and I quite enjoyed and I am recycling the baggy thing and putting the nozzle in the curbside recycling because its hard plastic and I think? (hope? that maybe?) it is recyclable.

But I’m human and far from the super organised eco-warrior superhero I’d like to be. I have a bunch of kids, a casual job, I study full-time, have an extended family etc etc.. It’s not an excuse it’s just, well..life.

In short, this week I achieved NOTHING! ZIP! ZILCH! NAHDAH!

I’m behind on a sample knit for a yarn company I absolutely adore, I haven’t finished implementing the changes to my honours project that my supervisor suggested two weeks ago, I have a whole bunch of revisions to do on a report for work that’s taken me a way longer to write up than it probably should of and another one that should probably be at least half finished now that isn’t and the Threenager ate toast with peanut butter for dinner tonight because I didn’t feel like arguing over food …

And you know what, it’s completely okay… 

The  skinny of it is – I’m human and life happens. Life happens a lot.

In fact life gets in the way of a lot of things.

I originally started this blog thinking that I would share all my wonderful low cost, low sugar, low waste household and budget recipes and tips with you all, but instead it’s turned out to be about a whole lot more…life as a whole…warts and all… and guess what…?

It’s messy and disorganised most of the time and that’s more than okay.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that if you drop the ball and buy that plastic wrapped product, put your apple cores in the compost instead of saving them for homemade vinegar, let the shower scum take over the bathroom this month because you were just too  busy or exhausted to clean or forgot to take your list when you went grocery shopping… it’s okay.

Nobody’s perfect. Sometimes it’s hard to keep up with all the “things”. We all have limits to how much we can physically achieve in a day and we all  (us mums especially) need to stop placing ridiculous expectations of perfection on ourselves. 

We’re all going to drop the ball sometimes.. and that’s totally okay.

Have you “dropped the ball” lately? Feel free to leave a comment and tell us all about it..
 

Feeding Families – It really doesn’t have to cost that much.

So after my post about groceries and what people considered a “normal” expense last week, I did a bit of digging around. Okay, I admit it, I spent hours on Facebook stalking frugal living and parenting pages. All this digital lurking did, however, confirm what I was already thinking –  that there’s a lot of people out there spending the majority of their weekly wages on feeding their families when they probably don’t really need to and that these people, while they aren’t happy about it at all, just accept it as part of life.

It makes me so sad to think that all those people out there are making themselves miserable over food. The majority of us here in Australia are fortunate enough to have easy access to a wide range of fresh, frozen and refrigerated produce at (almost always) affordable prices. So why are so many of us unable to feed our families good healthy food without spending ridiculous amounts at the checkout? Is it the way we shop or the way we eat? Do we just not educate our kids (and ourselves) well enough in the practicalities of life? Should things like budgeting, shopping, cleaning and cooking be part of the school curriculum? Why is something that should be so enjoyable, sitting down to a healthy, home cooked meal with your family so financially stressful for so many?

For example, today I stumbled across a page called Cooking for Busy Mums (it is kinda awesome, go check it out). The page owner asked people what they spent on groceries per week. Prices varied, some people really do have grocery shopping down pat, some do way better than us (we’re pretty good at the whole frugal food while being healthy thing but there’s ALWAYS room for improvement). But so many were struggling, some spending $400 per week on food for their (admittedly in many cases, larger than average) families. One woman admitted to spending around $150 AU every couple of days for a family of 4 or five. If you add that up (assuming from her post she goes to the grocery store 3 times a week) it comes to $450 for what most of us would consider an average (or even small) family. It was heartbreaking.

It’s one of the few page posts like this that  I’ve commented on. I’m usually just a lurker on most pages, reading posts and hitting the thumbs up button every now and then. I didn’t say much, just that our weekly spend was usually $100 (sometimes up to $150) and talked about what I spent at the butchers this week. Some others made similar comments, then someone jumped on and called us all out. I won’t note their name here, if you’re really keen you can scroll through the page and find it for yourself (so you can read it in context), but this was the comment:

“Unless people are growing their own fruit n veg I call bullshit on the posts stating $130 a week           for 7. This is all household requirements? Toilet paper, wash detergent (even home made)? It’s misleading as they then go on to state they have a freezer full of meat or cupboards already                stocked. So that’s $130 for a top up. Fruit and veg for a healthy family that large is around $70 minimum a week but I probably spend closer to $120 on fruit n veg alone for 7.”

Now I know that (especially in Australia) there can be HUGE fluctuations in the cost of fresh food, but our (larger than many) family is living proof that $130 AU a week is very do-able, toiletries, cleaning products and all and without resorting to feeding your kids noodles of the 2 minute kind every night (Although have you seen all those pretty homemade noodle lunches in mason jars all over Pinterest? I’m dying to try it.)

I’m not being mean or judgemental , this person is more than entitled to their opinion and not knowing their exact circumstances, such as  where they live or what grocery prices are in their area, this might be the case for them. But just like us, there’s always room for improvement right? Besides I can think of much more productive/enjoyable things to do with our dollars than eat them.

I did promise last week to show people how we manage to eat healthily on a pretty tight budget. We’ve always eaten pretty well, lots of wholefood. Meals made from scratch etc. But when we committed to really reducing what we sent into landfill (and for recycling), it got even better. I kept a fairly detailed record at the time because I wanted to be able to show the BHG, the Teens and the Uni Student that we could do it, and that it would save us money (and once we had a bit of a routine going – a bunch of stress especially after I finished study and found full time Archaeology work). I did have an advantage in that they’d already survived my almost completely overhauling our diet to drastically reduce our sugar intake.

So over the next few weeks I will post our initial pantry, fridge, freezer, toiletries and cleaning stock take and then each weeks shopping list and menu ( I don’t get receipts if I can help it and pay cash for most groceries unless I order online so you might have to take my word on prices – but I’m sure if you’re determined you can find comparable items online to check my numbers).

What We Already Had

I encourage everyone to do this every now and then. I should do it more often.

Go through your pantry, fridge and freezer with a fine tooth comb, empty them out onto the kitchen bench if you have to, and make a list of every single item, including toiletries and household cleaners. Believe me you’ll be very surprised how much is actually  there. Despite what the person posting on Facebook said, it’s a pretty rare occurrence in most households that the cupboards are completely empty (although this would be the case if  you moved interstate, overseas or were cleaned out by natural disaster or plague). Considering this, EVERY shop is a “top up” in that we add new items (meat, dairy, produce etc) to what we already have available. By knowing exactly what you have already you have more chance of controlling just how big (and expensive) that “top up” is.

I found some impulse buys that I brought because they’re “healthy”  and leftover bits and bobs from birthday party and cake makings. These days I’m actually a little ashamed of how wasteful a few things were. Like those full plastic jars of spice I brought for a single recipe that no one liked and the expensive coconut flour I now have to find recipes for. Regardless, here’s our initial stock take,warts and all.

This was taken on a Tuesday ( I shop mid-week because that’s usually when our pays go through and if I shop at the end of the week, the Teens eat everything before Monday so there’s nothing left for school lunches). I now there’s a lot of staples here (flour, rice etc) but bear with me over the next few weeks and you’ll see how we keep it stocked without having to outlay a whole lot on bulk items all at once.

The Fridge, Freezer & Pantry Stocktake (h/m = homemade and h/g = home grown)

 

Already in Fridge/Fruit & Veg

In the Freezer In the Pantry Cont..
250g Butter 4 x 500g Butter 1 can of Akta- Vite
3 L milk ½ Tub Frozen Greek Yoghurt Vanilla Essence (h/m)
Jam Chicken Carcass Plain & SR Flour
Mayonnaise (h/m -1/4 full) Vegie Scraps BBQ Sauce
½ Red Cabbage Leaves – broccoli etc 18 x Chutney& Pickles (h/m)
½ Green Cabbage Bread – for breadcrumbs etc Cat Food – Dry (h/m) & 6 Cans
4 Apples A banana Bread Flour
Lard Misc Frozen Fruit Pieces Baking Powder
500g Cheese Apple cores & Peel Bicarbonate of Soda
A jar of Taco Sauce  2 marinated chicken thighs 1.5 kg Rice Malt Syrup
A Jar of Tahini Cooked Rhubarb (h/m) Stevia
Some Cranberry Sauce Pumpkin Soup Dark Brown Sugar
Chives (fresh) Turkey & Veg Soup Lasagne Sheets
French Mustard Bones for Bone Broth 12 x Baked Beans
1 banana Chocolate Icepops (h/m) Yeast
2 grapefruit In the Pantry Icing Sugar
2 oranges 4 x Nori Sheets Lemon Essence
1 kiwi fruit 6 x Rice Paper Rounds 1 x Can Irish Stew
¼ Jar pickled cucumbers (h/m) Matcha Powder Weetbix 1.4 kg box
Bottle of Fish Sauce ¼ bottle sushi seasoning Wheaties 750g Box
¼ Jar Shredded Beetroot ½ packet soba noodles Rice Bubbles (about 100g)
3 Sweet potatoes ½ bottle Tamari Oats (about 500g)
4 Onions Sesame Oil 1X Jar Passatta
 Garlic (h/g) Molasses vegemite
Red Chillis (h/g) 1 x Bottle Wasabi Sauce 2 Jars Peanut butter
1 x Bottle h/m chilli sauce ½ Bottle Whoster Sauce honey
½ Jar Minced Ginger Xylotol Dark Choc chips
½ Jar Apple & Mint Jelly (h/m) Roasted pumpkin seeds (h/m) Coconut flour
½ Jar Grape Jelly (h/m) Coffee Beans & Instant Chia seeds
Handful of green grapes Tea Leaves (loose) lentils
100g Apricot & Almond Cheese Herbal Tea(loose) Milk powder
 ½ a Tomato Cocoa 1x can coconut milk
1 leek Dried Chick peas 3 x tins sardines
1 lemon Coconut oil 2 x large cans tuna
2 Yellow Capsicum Olive oil 2 x small tins tuna
6 ears of Corn Shredded coconut 2 x cans salmon
1 Zucchini Apple cider vinegar (h/m) dates
Glycerine Rum Essence
In the Laundry Almond Essence Cochineal
Soap Nuts Malt vinegar 1 x can kids savoury mince
Eucalyptus Oil 1 Bottle Hot Chilli Sauce 1 Jar ACV (fermenting)
1 Bar Soap 1 x can Irish Stew Soup 500g Cous Cous
White Vinegar ½ Packet Vita Wheats Tapioca Flour
cornflower Rice Flour
Toilet Almond Meal Walnuts
52 x Toilet Paper Rolls Tabasco Sauce Gelatine
  Linseed Meal 2 x packets Jelly Crystal
Kitchen Cleaning Xanthium Gum Ready to Roll Icing
4 Dishwasher Tablets Sprinkles ½ Jar Nutella
1 Bar Soap Barley A tin of pineapple pieces
3 Jars Citrus Cleaner (h/m) Dried Herbs & Spices Dried Herbs & Spices Cont..
1 Tub of Gumption (h/m) Ras el Hanout Mix (h/m) Cayenne Pepper
Bay Leaves Tarragon Leaves
In the Bathroom Curry Powder Fennel Seeds
1/2 Bottle 2 in 1 Shampoo Mustard seeds Chicken Salt
1 Tube Junior Toothpaste Cardamom Pods Chilli Flakes
1 Tube Regular Toothpaste Chives Ground Coriander
1 Bottle Shampoo Mustard Powder Oregano
½ Bottle Conditioner Sumac Poppy Seeds
 5 Bars Soap Turmeric BBQ Seasoning
 Deoderant & Toothpowder (h/m) Sweet Paprika Ground Ginger
Misc. Other Items Cloves Sea Salt
15ml Lemon Essential Oil Peppercorns Cajun Seasoning
15ml Lavender Essential Oil Paprika Harissa
Bentonite Clay Basil Garam Masala
DME Dill Leaf Tips Ground Nutmeg
Beeswax Mint Leaves Pickling Spice
Activated Charcoal Dutch Cinnamon Thyme Leaves
Shea Butter Mixed Herbs White Pepper

This list includes regular grocery items and  everything we use for homemade cleaners, deodorants etc. The Teens pay for any personal products that are non-essential ( things like hair wax, perfumes or make-up) from their own allowances/earnings. If the BHG and I buy wine or beer, which is fairly rare, that expense is taken out of our entertainment budget because it’s not an essential and something we consume purely for enjoyment.

Week 1

What I purchased to supplement this list – AKA: the shopping list

After checking out what was already in the house, I spent a little time (about 30 minutes) thinking up a few options for meals and snacks that would use these items. I try and stick to things I know everyone will eat. You can have the best est, most economical meal plan in the world, but if the kids won’t eat fried zucchini burgers, you may as well just forget shopping for groceries altogether and flush your $$$ straight down the toilet. Fortunately, my lot will eat (almost) anything, as long as there’s a little meat involved and maybe some chili or curry powder on it.

18 Beef Sausages (divided into 2 meals)                                               3 Litres Milk ($3 per Litre)

600g Mince Beef (divided into 3 meals)                                                 12 Eggs ($4)

250g Sausage Mince                                                                               4 Granny Smith Apples

2 Chicken Breasts (divided into 2 meals)                                             4 Pink Lady Apples

4  Lamb Chops                                                                                        8 Bananas

4 Medium Sized Beetroot                                                                       2 Red Capsicum

1 Bunch Dutch Carrots                                                                          2 Cauliflower (1.99 ea)

1 Bunch of Celery                                                                                   4 Bunches Leeks (99c ea)

4 Mandarins                                                                                             4 Large Brown Onions

680g Bottle of Passatta                                                                         6 Washed Potatoes

1 Whole Butternut Pumpkin                                                                  4 Tomatoes

This came to $89 AU. I also allowed $10 AU for milk throughout the week. Most of this was brought, package free or in paper through a greengrocer and our local butcher. The eggs were purchased from a local lady with free range chickens. Unfortunately, the milk is in a plastic bottle. The only recyclable  option available here at present.

Yes I know that’s a lot of toilet paper…

We buy on subscription through Who Gives a Crap?. 48 double sized plastic free  rolls arrive in a simple cardboard box on our doorstep every 16 weeks and costs us $56, yes we might find cheaper elsewhere if we really looked hard, but the 48 double rolls works out to $0.58c per regular roll  (48 x 2 = 96, $56 / 96 = $0.58c) which is more than comparable to other brands, plus we like their ethics, that it’s 100% recycled paper and the quality is fine.

A Note on How We Eat:

Except for cigarette smoke and skin sensitivities to artificial perfumes (myself, the Youngest Teen and the Uni Student), no one in our household has any allergies or special dietary requirements. We eat a fairly low sugar, wholefood diet. While we don’t eat what I would call a massive amount of meat, we’re not vegan or vegetarian (I  sometimes wish we were, but there’s no way the BHG or youngest Teen would go for it).

I cook. In a previous life I cooked for a living (at one stage for an army, literally) so family dinners most nights are a doddle.We do like simple food though. What I call REAL FOOD that tastes like, well, food and not the stuff with numbers for names. We’re not fanatical though, you’ll notice there’s some items on the stock-take (like Baked Beans in BBQ Sauce & a single jar of Nutella spread) that are brought purely because some members of the household REALLY like them. I figure it’s not such a bad trade-off to get the Teens & BHG to eat healthy the rest of the time.

We drink our fair share of tea and coffee. We all drink tea, mainly matcha or herbal blends I buy loose when we’re out and about. The BHG & I  drink the coffee. The BHG likes the Moccona brand instant stuff, but only gets it when it’s on super special, I prefer to grind my own so buy whole beans and keep them in the freezer. Otherwise it’s milk or water. The eldest Teen and I like to keep a jug of water with a few slices of lemon added in the refrigerator. We might have some juice if we squeeze it ourselves (but if you read some of the research around these days, fruit juice is the new evil, almost as evil as fizzy pop).

Next post I will share our menu for the week and some recipes.

 

 

You Spend What? On Groceries?!! Does feeding families REALLY have to cost that much?

I won’t copy and paste it here so I don’t embarrass anyone involved, but on my personal Facebook wall today read a conversation between several acquaintances discussing grocery shopping for larger families.

One person was ecstatic because they came in under their $450 per week grocery budget by about $70. Yes, You heard it, $450 PER WEEK to feed a family with no special dietary requirements.

Granted, this was for a large family of what equates to 6 adult sized eaters plus 2 toddlers and $70 is a huge saving in anyone’s books, but HOLY COW BATMAN! What are you feeding those people that costs that much per week? Gold Plated Cornflakes?

I didn’t say that of course. I actually only read the conversation and didn’t join in at all – you can do that on the ol’ FB.(Yeah, I’m a total FB stalker and I’m okay with that).  I’m not being judgmental. I would hate for someone to tell me how I should shop or feed my family and wouldn’t dream of doing it to someone else.

But I’m always amazed and a little sad that anyone believes spending that much on food per week is normal in a country where fresh food is abundantly available and for the most part, not too unreasonably priced. And the person who posted was not the only one ,there were five or six others with larger families confessing to similar food budgets in the same conversation.

It makes me wonder:

A) If they actually know how to shop (the person who initiated the conversation cooks/bakes a lot so it’s not like they were not buying all convenience foods). Were they ever taught how to do it? I wasn’t and it was definitely one of my biggest challenges when I first left home. I mean, I had seen my mother and grandmother do the grocery shopping, I had even gone with them, but no one had ever actually sat me down and said “Righto kiddo, this is how you work out what you need, what to buy and how to budget for it”.

B) How much of that $450 each week ends up in the compost or worse still landfill?

C) How can I, quietly and without being “preachy” help them find ways to lower their weekly food bill? (I do feel from the tone of the post and the online conversation that followed like this person may have actually posted as a way of saying that they were frustrated and need a little help in this area).

So how can I help?

By example is the best way I know how. I feed a family of  four adult eaters and one grazing preschool aged child each week, plus a university student who sometimes eats at home and the odd extra body (including the eldest Scrap Boy on those occasions that he deems us worthy of his presence). We eat well, we eat healthy (well I think we do, none of us has any food related medical or weight problems), no one ever goes hungry (despite what the teenagers may claim, there’s always snacks) and we manage to keep it all under $150 a week (most weeks it scrapes in under to $100).

It’s not always easy, and it does require a little planning and preparation each week, but it is very doable. Even when we’re all really busy.

We recently completed a pantry, refrigerator and freezer stock take as part of a food waste survey conducted by an environmental organisation. It wasn’t part of the survey, but we also took stock of all our regular toiletries and household cleaning products, just to see how much we were saving (or not) by shopping ethically and making our own instead of using commercial products.Over the next month or so I will be keeping track of everything we use/buy/eat (including recipes). We began this originally for our own benefit, but in after reading the discussion today, over the next few weeks I may publish a few posts with our results here so I can show anyone that may be interested just how we do it.